Hot Best Seller

The Slippery Slope

Availability: Ready to download

Dear Reader, Like handshakes, house pets, or raw carrots, many things are preferable when not slippery. Unfortunately, in this miserable volume, I am afraid that Violet, Klaus, and Sunny Baudelaire run into more than their fair share of slipperiness during their harrowing journey up--and down--a range of strange and distressing mountains.In order to spare you any further Dear Reader, Like handshakes, house pets, or raw carrots, many things are preferable when not slippery. Unfortunately, in this miserable volume, I am afraid that Violet, Klaus, and Sunny Baudelaire run into more than their fair share of slipperiness during their harrowing journey up--and down--a range of strange and distressing mountains.In order to spare you any further repulsion, it would be best not to mention any of the unpleasant details of this story, particularly a secret message, a toboggan, a deceitful map, a swarm of snow gnats, a scheming villain, a troupe of organized youngsters, a covered casserole dish, and a surprising survivor of a terrible fire.Unfortunately, I have dedicated my life to researching and recording the sad tale of the Baudelaire orphans. There is no reason for you to dedicate your-self to such things, and you might instead dedicate yourself to letting this slippery book slip from your hands into a nearby trash receptacle, or deep pit. With all due respect, Lemony Snicket


Compare

Dear Reader, Like handshakes, house pets, or raw carrots, many things are preferable when not slippery. Unfortunately, in this miserable volume, I am afraid that Violet, Klaus, and Sunny Baudelaire run into more than their fair share of slipperiness during their harrowing journey up--and down--a range of strange and distressing mountains.In order to spare you any further Dear Reader, Like handshakes, house pets, or raw carrots, many things are preferable when not slippery. Unfortunately, in this miserable volume, I am afraid that Violet, Klaus, and Sunny Baudelaire run into more than their fair share of slipperiness during their harrowing journey up--and down--a range of strange and distressing mountains.In order to spare you any further repulsion, it would be best not to mention any of the unpleasant details of this story, particularly a secret message, a toboggan, a deceitful map, a swarm of snow gnats, a scheming villain, a troupe of organized youngsters, a covered casserole dish, and a surprising survivor of a terrible fire.Unfortunately, I have dedicated my life to researching and recording the sad tale of the Baudelaire orphans. There is no reason for you to dedicate your-self to such things, and you might instead dedicate yourself to letting this slippery book slip from your hands into a nearby trash receptacle, or deep pit. With all due respect, Lemony Snicket

30 review for The Slippery Slope

  1. 5 out of 5

    Mischenko

    The Slippery Slope, book number ten in A Series of Unfortunate Events, begins right where book nine left off. It’s as terrifying as ever with poor little Sunny Baudelaire now separated from her older siblings and in Count Olaf’s clutches. Not only is Sunny in danger, but Violet and Klaus are in their own horrifying predicament: speeding down the Mortmain Mountains in an uncontrolled caravan. As they descend further and further away from Sunny, they scramble to concoct a plan, and contemplate whe The Slippery Slope, book number ten in A Series of Unfortunate Events, begins right where book nine left off. It’s as terrifying as ever with poor little Sunny Baudelaire now separated from her older siblings and in Count Olaf’s clutches. Not only is Sunny in danger, but Violet and Klaus are in their own horrifying predicament: speeding down the Mortmain Mountains in an uncontrolled caravan. As they descend further and further away from Sunny, they scramble to concoct a plan, and contemplate when and if they’ll be reunited with Sunny again. Violet and Klaus moved closer to one another, and felt the icy winds of the Mortmain Mountains blow down the road less traveled and give them goosebumps. They looked at the dark and swirling waters of the Stricken Stream, and they looked down from the edge of the peak into the mist, and then looked at one another and shivered, not only at the fates they had avoided, but all the mysterious fates that lay ahead. Every time we begin reading the next book in this series, it feels like a little more hope is lost, yet we must continue to find out the truth about what happened to the Baudelaires’ parents. It doesn’t matter how grimm things get, these kids are extremely intelligent, persevering, always polite, and incredibly strong; they stick together and pull themselves to safety time and time again. Sunny’s been one of our favorite characters since the beginning, and she’s matured tremendously over the course of the series. Her character really shines in this book as it’s made clear that she’s simply too smart for Count Olaf and his accomplices in the Mortmain Mountains. It’s hilarious the things that she’s able to teach her older siblings too. We’re looking forward to discovering her part in solving the mystery of V.F.D. and of course their parents. I know I’ve mentioned it before, but one of the recurring (and my favorite) themes in this series is loyalty, because the Baudelaires are willing to do anything for one another–even if it means risking their lives. They know that Count Olaf is wrong with all his despicable crimes, but at the same time (especially in this installment) they want to do what’s right. They find themselves “fighting fire with fire” and can’t ignore the thoughts running through their heads that two wrongs don’t make a right. I’ve heard multiple people say that these books aren’t good for children, but I disagree. The books are educational, teaching a good amount of vocabulary and multiple idioms. Not only that, we just love these characters as they have so many good qualities. The constant adversity in their turbulent lives does seem negative, but what’s important is how they handle these situations, in my opinion. What might seem to be a series of unfortunate events may, in fact, be the first steps of a journey. Something else we appreciate is the way the author brings characters into the series that are mentioned in previous installments, and at other times connects them. It’s always a nice surprise. Overall, this turned out to be an excellent addition to the series. The book was full of suspense! After the cliffhanger ending, we moved right on to book eleven which I’ll review soon. 4**** You can also read this review @www.readrantrockandroll.com

  2. 5 out of 5

    emma

    i couldn't encapsulate my love for this series with all the adjectives in a Verbose, Fond Dictionary. (more of a) review to come / 5 stars, obviously --------------- yes, i'm confidently continuing this reread i began two years ago and put on pause one year ago. what about it

  3. 4 out of 5

    Mark Lawrence

    I'm getting boring with 3* for the last 8 volumes in the series ... this one drifts close to 2*. The book opens with a double whammy of the oft-mentioned bad science combined with the not infrequent impossible-to-visualise scene. The Mortmain Mountains are bizarrely cube-shaped and have the expected vast vertical cliffs... one of which our heroes are hurtling toward in a loose caravan. This then begs the question ... how is there a slope for them to hurtle down? And the broader question about how I'm getting boring with 3* for the last 8 volumes in the series ... this one drifts close to 2*. The book opens with a double whammy of the oft-mentioned bad science combined with the not infrequent impossible-to-visualise scene. The Mortmain Mountains are bizarrely cube-shaped and have the expected vast vertical cliffs... one of which our heroes are hurtling toward in a loose caravan. This then begs the question ... how is there a slope for them to hurtle down? And the broader question about how a car is driven to the top of the tallest such mountain... Anyhow - this hurtling caravan is stopped with drag chute and by pouring a sticky combination of cooking ingredients on the wheels... a witches' brew containing as an ingredient that famously sticky substance ... uh ... olive oil... Anyhow - we get some Quagmire action in this volume and ... wait for it ... snogging! Sunny has a bunch of solo scenes with the enemy in which she shows her language, walking, and cooking skills all improving. Olaaf is deserted by some old cronies and meets some new ones. Carmelita Spats is back - yay! And we get to see the VFD head-quarters, albeit in reduced circumstances. The Sugar Bowl features - the ownership of which become the driving force behind much of the remaining series. Um.. there's a frozen waterfall, a variety of highly strained VFD acronyms, including the somewhat risible Verbal Fridge Dialogue. Issues of good vs evil and the greying of the space in between continue to feature. Celyn enjoyed it - for me it was one of the weakest volumes, just not really managing to be much more than a collection of things that happened. You should join my 3-emails-a-year mailing list for updates about my books. #prizes http://eepurl.com/cimnK1 ...

  4. 4 out of 5

    Ahmad Sharabiani

    The Slippery Slope (A Series of Unfortunate Events, #10), Lemony Snicket The Slippery Slope is the tenth novel in the children's novel series A Series of Unfortunate Events by Lemony Snicket. It was illustrated by Brett Helquist and released on September 23, 2003. In the novel, Violet and Klaus Baudelaire make their way up the Mortmain Mountains to rescue their sister Sunny from Count Olaf and his troupe. They meet Quigley Quagmire, a character who they thought to be dead, and visit the headquart The Slippery Slope (A Series of Unfortunate Events, #10), Lemony Snicket The Slippery Slope is the tenth novel in the children's novel series A Series of Unfortunate Events by Lemony Snicket. It was illustrated by Brett Helquist and released on September 23, 2003. In the novel, Violet and Klaus Baudelaire make their way up the Mortmain Mountains to rescue their sister Sunny from Count Olaf and his troupe. They meet Quigley Quagmire, a character who they thought to be dead, and visit the headquarters of a mysterious organization called "V.F.D." They are reunited with Sunny and manage to escape from Olaf. The book has received positive reviews and been translated into several different languages. تاریخ نخستین خوانش: روز بیست و پنجم ماه آوریل سال 2011 میلادی عنوان: آبشار یخ زده: مجموعه ماجراهای بچه‌‌ های بدشانس کتاب دهم؛ نویسنده: لیمونی اسنیکت؛ مترجم: رضا دهقان؛ تهران، ماهی، 1384؛ در 237 ص؛ شابک: 978964794804؛ چاپ سوم 1386؛ پنجم 1388؛ موضوع: داستانهای نوجوانان از نویسندگان امریکایی - سده 21 م عنوان: سراشیبی لغزنده؛ نویسنده: لیمونی اسنیکت؛ مترجم: حسین قنبری؛ مشهد، شریعه توس؛ 1384؛ در 276 ص؛ شابک: 9648557152؛ بودلرها در کوهستانی با «کوییگلی» برادر «ایزادورا» و «دانکن»، دو قلوهایی که در مدرسه دیدند، روبه رو می‌شوند و با کمک او «سانی» را نجات می‌دهند. ا. شربیانی

  5. 5 out of 5

    Lauren

    UPDATE: 19/Jan/2017 Ignore everything I said before, I like this book more now that I've finished the entire series. 26/Dec/2016 This series is REALLY dragging out. I'm so close to finishing it and discovering what everything means! BTW me giving a bunch of these books 3 & 2 stars does not me I don't like them.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Kate (GirlReading)

    3.75* these kids really can't catch a break, can they?...

  7. 5 out of 5

    Swaye

    My new favourite in the series. 💙 10 down, only 3 more to go!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Elaina

    I liked this one more than I thought I would!! Some of these books were starting to be a little redundant and it was getting kind of old :P But I liked this one a lot! We got to meet a certain new character and I was really happy about that person being introduced :D I can't say who because of spoilers lol It's hard to believe though that I only have three more books left in this series and then I am done!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Madeline

    Audiobook. Narrator Tim Curry. Yes, Tim Curry gets 100 stars!!! Woo-hoo! Hurray!!! And....I love his "evil chuckle". Makes my "evil chuckle" come out and play. Lol Mr. Curry's pronunciation of Count Olaf is a tad bit different than my pronunciation. His: O'Laugh. Mine: Ol' Off. His seems to be more appropriate. You can see how the author improved his stories. A Series of Unfortunate Events now seems more like a long continuous adventure. During the first four novels, it felt more like little "Un Audiobook. Narrator Tim Curry. Yes, Tim Curry gets 100 stars!!! Woo-hoo! Hurray!!! And....I love his "evil chuckle". Makes my "evil chuckle" come out and play. Lol Mr. Curry's pronunciation of Count Olaf is a tad bit different than my pronunciation. His: O'Laugh. Mine: Ol' Off. His seems to be more appropriate. You can see how the author improved his stories. A Series of Unfortunate Events now seems more like a long continuous adventure. During the first four novels, it felt more like little "Unfortunate Events" with no cohesion. Onward ho.....

  10. 4 out of 5

    Richard Cardenas

    This one was funny and thrilling in parts though it did lag a bit for me and I don't know why. It took me a few days to get through this one. I'm glad we know who that scout really was and we've run into more mysteries. I'm interested to see how the last three books wrap all of this up. Now starting The Grim Grotto! :) - Richard

  11. 5 out of 5

    Ashley Daviau

    While this book did lag for me a bit at the beginning, once it got going it was fantastic! There's a lot of exciting reveals and discoveries that really makes this one of the more interesting books of the lot and starts to set up the end of the series. I think my favourite part though would have to be the immense growth we see in Sunny throughout the book. It's where she starts to really become a child rather than a baby. As per usual with this series, I really loved this book and can't wait to While this book did lag for me a bit at the beginning, once it got going it was fantastic! There's a lot of exciting reveals and discoveries that really makes this one of the more interesting books of the lot and starts to set up the end of the series. I think my favourite part though would have to be the immense growth we see in Sunny throughout the book. It's where she starts to really become a child rather than a baby. As per usual with this series, I really loved this book and can't wait to get started on the next in the series!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Meghan

    JANUARY 2017 RE-READ It's so hard to choose a favourite Quagmire. ...Just kidding, no it's not. Quigley is the best, hands down. This was also more incredible than I remembered! So much information on VFD. We get to see more of Count Olaf's undisguised (literally) nastiness. There's the unexpected return of Carmelita Spats. We get to see Sunny be a hero in her own right (there's the surprisingly powerful quote "I'm not a baby"). There's the somewhat redemption of the white-faced women. There's the JANUARY 2017 RE-READ It's so hard to choose a favourite Quagmire. ...Just kidding, no it's not. Quigley is the best, hands down. This was also more incredible than I remembered! So much information on VFD. We get to see more of Count Olaf's undisguised (literally) nastiness. There's the unexpected return of Carmelita Spats. We get to see Sunny be a hero in her own right (there's the surprisingly powerful quote "I'm not a baby"). There's the somewhat redemption of the white-faced women. There's the addition of two new villains: the man with a beard but no hair and the woman with hair but no beard. There's more hinting at our faithful narrator's role in this whole thing. Basically, a lot of great and important things happen in this installment.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Chelsea

    Mini Review: These last few are just getting better and better! The stories are different, there's more suspense, and I'm just overall more interested. Really excited to be nearing the end!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Marianne

    The Slippery Slope is the tenth book in A Series of Unfortunate Events by American author, Lemony Snicket (aka Daniel Handler). As we once again join the unlucky Baudelaire orphans, they find themselves separated: Sunny held captive in Count Olaf’s car while Violet and Klaus seem destined to perish in a runaway caravan down a steep hill. Having narrowly escaped a burning hospital and already suffered the loss of their parents, the threat of marriage, slave labour, hypnosis, a terrible boarding s The Slippery Slope is the tenth book in A Series of Unfortunate Events by American author, Lemony Snicket (aka Daniel Handler). As we once again join the unlucky Baudelaire orphans, they find themselves separated: Sunny held captive in Count Olaf’s car while Violet and Klaus seem destined to perish in a runaway caravan down a steep hill. Having narrowly escaped a burning hospital and already suffered the loss of their parents, the threat of marriage, slave labour, hypnosis, a terrible boarding school, being thrown down a lift shaft, being thrown in jail, acting in a freak show and the murder of their Uncle Monty and Aunt Josephine at the hands of the evil Count Olaf and his nefarious assistants, the siblings are ever-vigilant of his reappearance, although this instalment sees them travelling with him, in disguise, to the Mortmain Mountains . Luckily these well-mannered and uncomplaining children are also very resourceful: Violet invents, Klaus researches and Sunny bites. Snicket’s tone throughout is apologetic, sincere and matter-of-fact as he relates the unfortunate events in the children’s lives; his imaginative and even surreptitiously educational style will hold much appeal for younger readers, as will the persistent silliness of adults. Snicket’s word and phrase definitions are often hilarious. As always, the alliterative titles are delightful and Brett Helquist provides some wonderfully evocative illustrations. After seemingly marking time for the last few books, finally, there are some developments that begin to unravel the mystery of the fate of the Baudelaire parents, and an unexpected ally assists Violet and Klaus as they try to rescue Sunny. But their concern for their baby sister is apparently unwarranted, as Sunny not only takes care of herself, but also manages to overhear some vital information, and, luckily, her communication skills have improved exponentially. Our ever resourceful orphans use a sticky mess to get themselves out of a sticky mess, as well as utilising hammocks, a ukulele, forks, a hand mirror, a breadknife and couple of coats for various purposes. They find coded messages in unusual places and are surprised by facts revealed about their parents. Will the Baudelaires reach the alternate VFD headquarters before Count Olaf does, and will they find a surviving parent there? Readers will have to read the next instalment, The Grim Grotto, to find out. 3.5 stars

  15. 4 out of 5

    Bea

    2.5 stars. More complex writing in this one (for a middle grade book) and the author makes contradicting points like describing the mountains as square but also vertically sloping? However I did still enjoy it overall but it just wasn’t as engaging or interesting as some other books in the series.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Deborah Markus

    Think how hard it is to write one really good book for *any* age group. Lemony Snicket wrote 13 terrific books in a row, and it's accurate to say they're splendid for all ages. (I know I'm getting ahead of myself, since this is only book 10. I've actually read them all already at least once before; but now I have all the recorded versions, so I'm treating myself to a mostly-Tim-Curry-narrated run-through.) "The Slippery Slope" continues Snicket's ongoing philosophical exploration of, well, slippe Think how hard it is to write one really good book for *any* age group. Lemony Snicket wrote 13 terrific books in a row, and it's accurate to say they're splendid for all ages. (I know I'm getting ahead of myself, since this is only book 10. I've actually read them all already at least once before; but now I have all the recorded versions, so I'm treating myself to a mostly-Tim-Curry-narrated run-through.) "The Slippery Slope" continues Snicket's ongoing philosophical exploration of, well, slippery slopes. As if they weren't busy enough just managing to survive, the Baudelaires are now troubled by a recurring, critical question: How do you tell the difference between a good guy and a bad guy? The two older Baudelaire siblings have to rescue their younger sister Sunny from the clutches of Count Olaf and his cohorts. Violet and Klaus eventually find, to their horror, that they've talked themselves into trapping and kidnapping one of those cohorts in order to arrange a hostage exchange. Easy enough to rationalize that they are, after all, trying to rescue a baby, and that the potential hostage in question is thoroughly evil and tried to kill *them* earlier in their adventures. The question won't go away: How can you call yourself a good person when your actions mirror those of your enemy? Snicket manages to engage readers on this issue without being the least bit ham-handed. He also touches gently and beautifully on the first awakenings of romantic attraction Violet feels -- toward a character whose existence is a delightful surprise to Baudelaires and readers alike.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Mel

    Finished this 11 minutes after cramathon ended... what's the point. I liked this one. I love that the pieces are falling together. I am so excited to finally see how this story ends. I hate that I have read 12/13 of these books.. I'm almost there..

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    100% going to put "The World is Quiet Here" on the wall of my future library. 📚💕

  19. 5 out of 5

    Kayla

    The humour in this book is so dark and twisted and I LOVE it!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Kimberley doruyter

    i kinda just want to skip to the last book. that's not a good sign.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Marnie Krüger

    I don't know why, but this one has always been my favorite.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Constantin

    The story becomes better and better! I also love the fact that Sunny grows older book after book.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Swankivy

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. "In order to spare you any further repulsion, it would be best not to mention any of the unpleasant details of this story, particularly a secret message, a toboggan, a deceitful trap, a swarm of snow gnats, a scheming villain, a troupe of organized youngsters, a covered casserole dish, and a surprising survivor of a terrible fire." A SERIES OF UNFORTUNATE EVENTS number ten picks up at the point of the last book's cliffhanger. Count Olaf has separated the Baudelaire orphans from each other for the "In order to spare you any further repulsion, it would be best not to mention any of the unpleasant details of this story, particularly a secret message, a toboggan, a deceitful trap, a swarm of snow gnats, a scheming villain, a troupe of organized youngsters, a covered casserole dish, and a surprising survivor of a terrible fire." A SERIES OF UNFORTUNATE EVENTS number ten picks up at the point of the last book's cliffhanger. Count Olaf has separated the Baudelaire orphans from each other for the first time in the series, kidnapping the baby Sunny and cutting the tie to Violet and Klaus's caravan so that they are left helplessly tumbling down a mountain. On their way to a secret hideout, Count Olaf and his girlfriend Esmé gloat at having kidnapped Sunny, and their henchmen (some of Count Olaf's former acting troupe, joined by three freaks from the circus they've just left) are tagging along. The book opens with Violet and Klaus trying to find a way to stop their dangerously hurtling, engineless caravan. Violet's inventing skills get them out of that mess, but they lose the caravan over a cliff after they've rescued some warm clothes and other useful things from it. Unfortunately, they run into a swarm of snow gnats, which drive them into a cave. Inside the cave, they are surprised to see that a group of campers has taken up residence. They are driving the gnats away with a campfire, and they wear fencing masks which keep the gnats out. One of this group happens to be Carmelita Spats, the Baudelaires' old enemy from Prufrock Preparatory back in The Austere Academy. Meanwhile, Sunny is being badly treated by Olaf, Esmé, and the henchmen. They gloat about their crimes. Sunny sits secure in the knowledge that her siblings will find her. The elder two Baudelaires camp out in the cave with this group called the Snow Scouts, who have an idiotic alphabetical pledge that they say over and over. One of the campers, however, starts giving them strange clues (by saying phrases whose first letters spell out "V.F.D."), and so they decide this camper is an ally. After everyone falls asleep, the boy leads them up a secret passage. During their travels up the passage, the author attempts to bore the reader with the description, and urges several times that you should stop reading now, only to finally cut to a "secret" letter to his sister. Lemony Snicket says he is taking a big risk hiding the letter in his book, and says he may have found evidence that will point to Olaf as the arsonist whose crimes are getting pinned on the author. He asks his sister to meet him on Beatrice's birthday in the Hotel Denouement. (Beatrice is the mystery woman to whom all the Series of Unfortunate Events books are dedicated, remember.) He urges her to please get them a room without ugly curtains. Now we rejoin Sunny, in the clutches of her captors. As she prepares breakfast, the villains glorify bad hygiene and horrible crimes and disgusting habits, and finally they talk about going to burn down the V.F.D. headquarters. Two very evil people arrive. (They are so evil that the author will not mention their names, and decides instead to call them "the man with a beard, but no hair" and "the woman with hair, but no beard.") The evil people say they've already burned down V.F.D., and they give Esmé a little souvenir, which the evil man says he thinks is a cigarette, even though when she tries to smoke it (because cigarettes are so "in"), it just smells bad and spews green smoke. Then the evil people present to Olaf a stack of papers called "the Snicket file." The elder two Baudelaires reach the V.F.D. headquarters with their new guide, and they have to break the code on the "Vernacularly Fastened Door," which of course operates on language cues. Once they are in, they see that the whole place has been burned down, much to their surprise. Violet and Klaus, bitterly disappointed to not find the expected "survivor of the fire," call out for their parents, but of course no one answers. The sweatered scout reveals that HE is the survivor of the fire, though not the same fire the Baudelaires were thinking of. He is Quigley Quagmire, the third Quagmire triplet who was presumed dead in his own house fire. He'd been hoping to find his siblings Isadora and Duncan. No such luck. Quigley and the Baudelaires exchange all the information they know about their linked tragedies. It is revealed that there was a "schism," where the members of V.F.D. split into two factions, and presumably the orphans' parents were in one side with Jacques Snicket while Count Olaf, Esmé, and other evil people (like the eye doctor from The Miserable Mill) were in the other. They agree to join forces to rescue Sunny and find the other two Quagmire triplets. And conveniently, they spot a pillar of green smoke coming from the top of the mountain--it's a Verdant Flammable Device (Esmé's "cigarette"), just like a V.F.D. member would use. Violet invents a type of climbing shoes and an ice tester from some forks and a candelabra, and she and Quigley make the climb, and the author allows the two "a moment of privacy" where it is insinuated that they had a romantic encounter. Afterwards, they make it to the top of the slope and they find Sunny. Sunny chooses to stay behind rather than be rescued, because she wants to find out the location of the "last safe place" that everyone keeps mentioning. The villains wish to burn it down, but the children would like to get there and meet the members of V.F.D., one of whom might be a surviving parent of theirs. Violet is reluctant to leave her baby sister there, but Sunny says, "I'm not a baby" (her longest sentence yet), and the two rescuers make their way back down the mountain to see how Klaus is doing. Klaus has figured out that the items left in the fridge are a sort of code, to point them at the sugar bowl containing a clue. It also turns out Klaus has found out that there is one safe place to go as well. As long as Sunny finds out where that is, they'll be set, but then they realize they don't have a plan to rescue Sunny. They decide that they will capture something that Olaf wants . . . rather, they will capture someONE, his girlfriend Esmé, by luring her with the smell of the "cigarettes" she thinks are so "in." They spend all night digging a pit to trap her in, and begin to wonder if they are villains themselves. Morning comes and Sunny's False Spring Rolls are a big hit with the villains, and afterwards she sees Olaf and Esmé appearing in horrific fashions (Count Olaf has even washed his face!). Olaf blurts that he can't wait to start recruiting new villain members and to burn down the Hotel Denouement--ta-da, the last safe place! Then Esmé notices the green smoke at the bottom of the slope, and decides to use her toboggan to slide down and find where those cigarettes are. Right before she falls into their pit trap, the children decide that trapping her is wrong, and they conceal their faces with the Snow Scout masks and jump out, telling Esmé not to fall into the trap. They come clean with her and tell her what they were planning, and they end up taking her back up the slope with them to confront Count Olaf. Pretending they are actual V.F.D. members, they find Olaf and say they are there to take Sunny Baudelaire away, and when Olaf taunts them on the grounds that they have no leverage, they reply that they know where the sugar bowl is. Olaf demands the sugar bowl, of course. The children demand the safe return of Sunny first, and Olaf says he'd rather throw them all off the mountain. Esmé argues that giving up the baby is necessary to get the sugar bowl, and Olaf retorts that keeping the baby prisoner is necessary to get the Baudelaire fortune. They argue back and forth like spoiled children until the man with a beard but no hair interrupts them. Finally, about a billion things happen at once: The Snow Scouts arrive, having been targeted for "recruitment" by Olaf's troupe. In trying to rescue the Scouts from the terrible fate, the Baudelaires and Quigley reveal who they are, and Olaf attempts to threaten them by ordering Sunny thrown off the mountain. Something surprising happens: The two white-faced women who have worked for Olaf all along disobey his orders, saying that they lost a sibling in a mysterious house fire themselves, obviously caused by Olaf for purposes of recruitment. They leave, never to be seen again. (Olaf attempts to throw Sunny off the mountain himself, but finds that the casserole dish she was using for a bed actually now contains an eggplant instead of a young girl.) Sunny rejoins her siblings. The man with a beard but no hair uses a whistle to give orders to a flock of enslaved eagles: He forces them to draw up a net around the Snow Scouts. (Apparently eagles and lions are aligned with Olaf's side of the V.F.D. schism, while trained reptiles and carrier crows are on the "good" side.) The plan is to burn down these Scouts' homes and acquire their various family inheritances. Olaf's group entreats Carmelita Spats (the only non-captured Snow Scout) to join the group, and she agrees. The Baudelaires and Quigley decide escape is better than trying to face the villainous scum, so they run away on the toboggan. Disaster strikes and the toboggan goes out of control on the melting slope, and Quigley gets swept away by a different current, leaving the Baudelaires hoping to find Hotel Denouement to meet him at the last safe place. The book ends with the siblings pondering more mysteries than they've solved.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Marjorie Campbell

    The Slippery Slope (A Series of Unfortunate Events, Book 10) Lemony Snicket I have been working my way through the Series of Unfortunate Events series for two reasons. The first is that I love to read and will read virtually any genre of book if I hear good things about it; and the second is that I am previewing books with a view to building a library for my daughter. This series has had some peaks and valleys - with certain books in the series being stronger than others as stand-alone stories. I The Slippery Slope (A Series of Unfortunate Events, Book 10) Lemony Snicket I have been working my way through the Series of Unfortunate Events series for two reasons. The first is that I love to read and will read virtually any genre of book if I hear good things about it; and the second is that I am previewing books with a view to building a library for my daughter. This series has had some peaks and valleys - with certain books in the series being stronger than others as stand-alone stories. I stumbled a bit between book 6 and 8 as these were less dynamic and did not help the reader to understand enough about the underlying mystery of what was happening to the Beaudelaire orphans and why. Introducing a new villain did not justify a whole book (as with book 6) and so my continuing to read the series was more a bloody-minded drive to finish - rather than out of interest. Book 9 recaptured my interest it sees the children were given a moral dilemma at the end, which makes the book meatier. I have never believed that children are unable to feel or understand difficult ideas or situations but rather that they process them in a different way to adults. Book 10 is really a great deal of fun and thus far is my favourite. Now that Sunny Beaudelaire is able to do more than simply bite on things she is emerging as a great comedic character. The swashbuckling, action packed The Slippery Slope is full of great one-liners and gags that will keep any reader interested. Finally (!), some of the mysteries surrounding the VDF are being unraveled (just enough so that the reader can tolerate some further new mysteries). I now feel that the series justifies its space on my shelves.

  25. 5 out of 5

    falling asleep reading

    Ah, the climax of the series. From Quigley, to the meaning of VFD, to the return of Carmelita Spats, this book was a ride. Seeing Sunny separated from her siblings made for a great narrative. Poor Sunny was taken hostage and forced to cook for the monster that is Count Olaf and his equally terrible theatre troupe. She was put into a very terrifying and difficult situation but she remained calm and logically thought about what she had to do and how to act in order to survive and see her siblings Ah, the climax of the series. From Quigley, to the meaning of VFD, to the return of Carmelita Spats, this book was a ride. Seeing Sunny separated from her siblings made for a great narrative. Poor Sunny was taken hostage and forced to cook for the monster that is Count Olaf and his equally terrible theatre troupe. She was put into a very terrifying and difficult situation but she remained calm and logically thought about what she had to do and how to act in order to survive and see her siblings again. Sunny Baudelaire is the bravest little girl (not a baby.) Not only do we learn more about the history of VFD and its very meaning in this book, but we also learn more about some of the characters, especially Count Olaf’s troupe. I think we finally see their true character. The members starting to leave one by one and abandoning Count Olaf to be the individual practitioner of a villain he always wanted to be makes perfect sense. This continues to show the grey area between good and evil, which I love. The foreshadowing in this book is once again, amazing. If Lemony Snicket does anything well, it's his use of foreshadowing. *Kisses fingers* this book is nothing short of a masterpiece.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Darren Hagan

    Is it getting boring me saying that I liked this installment :') This may be a bit spoiler-ish. Proceed with caution ;) So the things I liked about this one are: - Sunny's time to shine. She spends basically the entire book split up from her siblings after being kidnapped by Olaf. This really gives us a chance to see what she can do on her own, and how much she has grown up throughout the books - The return of a character "from the dead", won't say who though. Also the return of a couple of other c Is it getting boring me saying that I liked this installment :') This may be a bit spoiler-ish. Proceed with caution ;) So the things I liked about this one are: - Sunny's time to shine. She spends basically the entire book split up from her siblings after being kidnapped by Olaf. This really gives us a chance to see what she can do on her own, and how much she has grown up throughout the books - The return of a character "from the dead", won't say who though. Also the return of a couple of other characters from previous books - The whole VFD thing. You're still not 100% sure what it stands for or what it's purpose is, but it constantly teases you with other phrases beginning with VFD, like very fresh dill and vertical flame diversion and many more. It really makes you want to find out But yeah I enjoyed this book on the whole, those were just some things I really liked :)

  27. 4 out of 5

    Nadine

    "Fate is like a strange, unpopular restaurant, filled with odd waiters who bring you things you never asked for and don't always like." The Slippery Slope finally brings us to the mysterious V.F.D. headquarters, but only leave us with more questions than answers. I'm starting to get the feeling that by the end of the series all my questions won't be answered. I'm keeping my fingers crossed that I'll get the answers soon! Full series review: https://todaysechos.wordpress.com/201...

  28. 5 out of 5

    ~Bellegirl91~

    *** 1 1/2 stars.... EVEN MORE BORING despite Tim Curry reading it* yeah it got "worse" and I'm sooooooo done! but now I've got 3 to go and can finish the series on netflix. so since Mr. Lemony Snicket is always saying to put these books down and say go read something else, I'm posting the sexy eye roll gif and found out it's an actor names Marlon Brando and dang was he good looking! so taking Lemony Snicket's advice and see or read something better, I'm also putting two great gifs of Marlon eatin *** 1 1/2 stars.... EVEN MORE BORING despite Tim Curry reading it* yeah it got "worse" and I'm sooooooo done! but now I've got 3 to go and can finish the series on netflix. so since Mr. Lemony Snicket is always saying to put these books down and say go read something else, I'm posting the sexy eye roll gif and found out it's an actor names Marlon Brando and dang was he good looking! so taking Lemony Snicket's advice and see or read something better, I'm also putting two great gifs of Marlon eating and some girl trying to kiss him while he's into his food hahaha (which describes my love life right now..... food..... and that is an "unfortunate event" for me in my life..... so while the Baudelaire's are having their own series of unfortunate events, I'm now going to go be the epitome of being 26 and single and enjoying my food while dancing badly and that includes lip syncing with my earbuds while on while on sleep deprivation right now. :) (jace says it all....) see how much I love this book series? I just threw in some random stuff.... oh wait..... SO DOES LEMONY SNICKET!! so annoying. but I'll admit one thing: I DID like how clever it was when hearing the true story of the V.F.D. group and how Olaf ended up on the other side etc. but 10 FREAKING BOOKS!!!??? AND THEN 3 MORE?? (also isn't hodge Starkweather up there just adorable? *heart eye emoji*) so just like Lemony Snicket saying random things, here's my random gifs of a good looking Marlon Brando as promised...... SEXY EYE ROLL (I know, this review is weird and different and dumb but so are these books....... ESPECIALLY this one considering it was the only one so far that REALLY REALLY dragged and I got SUPER bored SUPER fast so I may as well make a boring review on sleep deprivation ha!)

  29. 4 out of 5

    Kinga

    “We’ve managed to investigate so many mysteries, and yet there’s still so much we don’t know.” We still know basically nothing! How is this even possible after reading ten books?? But at least, this means that surely we would get to those answers in the last 3 parts of this series of unfortunate events. And it not then I would be quite a bit pissed, I guess. This one was more of a play on the alphabet than the rest of the series so far, and I liked it because of this. It’s all still clever, and I “We’ve managed to investigate so many mysteries, and yet there’s still so much we don’t know.” We still know basically nothing! How is this even possible after reading ten books?? But at least, this means that surely we would get to those answers in the last 3 parts of this series of unfortunate events. And it not then I would be quite a bit pissed, I guess. This one was more of a play on the alphabet than the rest of the series so far, and I liked it because of this. It’s all still clever, and I loved the little interludes of Lemony Snicket’s random thoughts and memories, that somehow – I think – should be related to the story? But since we still have a couple million questions left, I cannot say that for sure. “Fate is like a strange, unpopular restaurant, filled with odd waiters who bring you things you never asked for and don’t always like.” So yeah, three more to go! I’m getting more and more curious how this would all end. And without any specific spoilers, this was the very first book when instead of someone being murdered, we actually got to see someone coming back from the dead, a phrase which here means “it turned out that someone was not dead at all and hasn’t died in this part either”. I have two more quotes! One is a lie, because well-read people could become the most genius of villans: “And in my experience, well-read people are less likely to be evil.” And another which is also a lie, since I was already a weary, weeping, and well-read person before jumping into this series: “…and find something better to do with your time besides finishing this unhappy tale and becoming a weary, weeping, and well-read person.”

  30. 4 out of 5

    Julie

    What do five stars mean anymore, I don't even know. But this one was so, so much better than the previous book -- now we're finally getting into lots more worldbuilding and exposition about what's going on, shit is even getting real with Lemony Snicket's side-narrative (!!!), Sunny is showing character development(!), the white-faced women defected (!!), and (view spoiler)[QUIGLEY QUAGMIRE, AND QUIGLEY/VIOLET, AND AHHH (hide spoiler)] . So many amazing things are happening now!! Hotel Denouement, What do five stars mean anymore, I don't even know. But this one was so, so much better than the previous book -- now we're finally getting into lots more worldbuilding and exposition about what's going on, shit is even getting real with Lemony Snicket's side-narrative (!!!), Sunny is showing character development(!), the white-faced women defected (!!), and (view spoiler)[QUIGLEY QUAGMIRE, AND QUIGLEY/VIOLET, AND AHHH (hide spoiler)] . So many amazing things are happening now!! Hotel Denouement, my body is fucking ready.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.